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Americans Shouldn’t Have to Drive, but the Law Insists on It

Professor Shill recently published an article in The Atlantic, titled “Americans Shouldn’t Have to Drive, but the Law Insists on It.”

From the article:

It’s no secret that American public policy throughout the 20th century endorsed the car—for instance, by building a massive network of urban and interstate highways at public expense. Less well understood is how the legal framework governing American life enforces dependency on the automobile. To begin with, mundane road regulations embed automobile supremacy into federal, state, and local law. But inequities in traffic regulation are only the beginning. Land-use law, criminal law, torts, insurance, vehicle safety regulations, even the tax code—all these sources of law provide rewards to cooperate with what has become the dominant transport mode, and punishment for those who defy it.

Read the full article here. These ideas are expanded in Professor Shill’s article, forthcoming in the New York University Law Review, “Should Law Subsidize Driving?

Gregory H. Shill, Americans Shouldn’t Have to Drive, but the Law Insists on It, Atlantic (July 9, 2019), https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/07/car-crashes-arent-always-unavoidable/592447/.

For more publications by Professor Shill, visit his faculty bibliography page.

Greg Shill