Welcome to Iowa Law

Ambition and Civility

Are Not Mutually Exclusive

Year 1

Year 1

Foundation for a Career

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Year 2

Year 2

Specialize in Your Interests

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Year 3

Year 3

They Call You "Counselor"

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News | Events

Professor and Associate Dean Marcella David Joins FAMU as Provost

November 25, 2014

Members of the Law School Community,

Today, President Elmira Mangum of the Florida A & M University announced that Professor and Associate Dean Marcella David will join her leadership team as Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs.  Provost David will begin her new role on February 2.  The Florida A & M press release is available at: http://www.famunews.com/?p=2110.

This is a bittersweet moment for our community.  I know you share my joy for Provost David as she takes on this new challenge, as well as my sadness as she leaves Iowa Law.  We are proud of her, and we are grateful for all her contributions to the University of Iowa and the College of Law.

Provost David joined our faculty in 1995, spending five years of her tenure in central administration.   She is an innovative teacher and an inspiration to her students.  Both on central campus and at the law school, she has taken on a wide-range of leadership roles.  As associate dean, she has led our international and comparative law programs and has taken responsibility for many special initiatives, including the Hubbard pipeline program and Bridging the Gap and the new SJD and the two-year, advanced standing JD program for international lawyers.  She chaired last year's self-study and strategic planning process and is currently chairing our enrollment management committee.  Provost David has brought her creativity, can-do attitude, and good judgment to the Dean' Leadership Group and to the Iowa Law School Foundation Board of Directors.  We will miss her very much.

Please join me in congratulating Provost David and wishing her continued great success as she takes on new challenges.

Gail B. Agrawal
Dean and F. Wendell Miller Professor of Law

 

Professor Onwuachi-Willig to Receive Clyde Ferguson Award

Professor Onwuachi-Willig was selected to receive the AALS Minority Groups Section's highest honor for senior faculty: Clyde Ferguson, Jr. Award.  She will be the co-recipient with Mario Barnes, UCI Law.  This award will make Professors Barnes and Onwuachi-Willig the first people to have received both the Derrick A. Bell, Jr. Award and the Clyde Ferguson, Jr. Award.

As the description indicates, "[t]he Clyde Ferguson Award, named in honor Professor C. Clyde Ferguson, Jr.-the second tenured African American on the Harvard Law School faculty-is granted to an outstanding law teacher, who in the course of his or her career has achieved excellence in the areas of public service, teaching and scholarship. . . .   The Award is particularly aimed at law teachers who have provided support, encouragement and mentoring to colleagues, students, and aspiring legal educators. All current and former professional legal educators are eligible including administrators, librarians, clinical faculty, legal writing teachers, tenure track and tenured faculty, as long as they have served more than seven years in legal academia at the time of the Award."

The award will be presented at the Section's Luncheon on Monday, January 5, at the AALS Meeting in D.C.

Professor VanderVelde Publishes Groundbreaking Book - "Redemption Songs: Suing for Freedom before Dred Scott"

"In her path-breaking earlier work, Mrs. Dred Scott: A Life on Slavery's Frontier (reviewed July 2010 in this magazine), legal historian Lea VanderVelde skillfully excavated the life story of Harriet Scott, the brave woman and wife of Dred Scott who spearheaded the famous case Dred Scott v. Sandford (60 U.S. 393 (1857)). In Redemption Songs, VanderVelde's remarkable follow-up, the University of Iowa law professor takes the ambitious step of researching the broader context of "freedom suits" filed in St. Louis, Missouri, between 1814 and 1860, in which hundreds of slaves petitioned the courts for their and their children's emancipation."

See more at: http://www.callawyer.com/clstory.cfm?eid=937938&wteid=937938_Redemption_Songs:__Suing_for_Freedom_before_Dred_Scott#sthash.j3vOFHzB.dpuf

Year 1

The foundation of your career

Personal Attention    Writing Faculty    Faculty Student Ratio

Building legal skills, learning to think like a lawyer, gaining the tools to practice with integrity.

In your first year, we emphasize essential writing skills, analytical thinking, and a sharpened understanding of the role of legal institutions. You’ll take full advantage of our being one of the few law schools in the nation with a full-time legal writing faculty. 

First-year students will have two, small-section courses each semester with the professors in our Legal Analysis, Writing, and Research department. These classes deliver intensive, inpidualized instruction, with three to six conferences per term devoted to your legal writing projects.

Year 2

Specialize in your interests

Citizen Lawyer    Moot Court    Externships

Develop your knowledge, with an expanded focus on the areas of law you’re most drawn to. The experts are here.
 
In your second year, you’ll begin to gravitate toward the areas that interest you most. Our faculty are experts across the legal spectrum, and every aspect of modern law practice is covered, including international and comparative law.
 
Iowa Law’s Citizen Lawyer Program offers a wide variety of opportunities for pro bono work, community service, and philanthropic projects. Another way students extend their education beyond the classroom, developing professional skills is through a variety of moot court competitions—and Iowa consistently prepares winning moot court teams.
 
In our externship program, we place students in a variety of legal settings. Externships are the best preparation for your career, and a great way to make professional contacts. In fact, many students’ first job after graduating is one that began as an externship.

Year 3

They call you "Counselor"

Law Review    Legal Clinic    Study Abroad

Build your professional identity and accumulate deep experience in a supportive environment. Practice makes practitioners.
 
By the time you reach your third year, you’ll take advantage of an array of opportunities, putting into practice the cutting-edge legal theory and core doctrinal concepts you’ve mastered in your first two years. Perhaps you’ll work in the “Bullpen” in our legal clinic. Every year our students provide thousands of hours to underserved clients and other special-needs populations, representing clients and honing their legal skills under close faculty supervision.
 
Iowa Law is also home to four student-run law journals. Many students write for a journal during their second year and accept board positions during their third year.